“Death should not have taken thee, thou much loved one! Nor all the joys of earth be given to me in vain;

Thy soul was like a star and dwelt apart: Thou hadst a voice whose sound was like the sea: Pure as the naked heavens, majestic, free. In death it doth abide. I weep for thee.”

Percy Bysshe Shelley This is a poem about the loss of someone important to the author. The speaker laments that death should not have taken “thee” and expresses his grief over their absence in three stanzas,

each describing one similarity between what he loved of them and what has been lost because they are gone:

thy voice, thou soul/star (representing purity), thy song like unto the sea (freedom). He concludes by weeping for “thee,” or those who have passed on. This work is an example of how poetry can be used as a means for emotional expression. The poet’s emotions come through very clearly without any explicit interpretation needed from us–but also without becoming too sentimental or m

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